Download Akira Vol. I, No. 1 by Katsuhiro Otomo PDF

By Katsuhiro Otomo

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20 years ago, Mike Seeley joined me as office manager, and he has been keeping chaos at bay ever since. Like everyone else, Mike works with me part-time, but you’d never know it to see my studio. As anyone who’s ever dealt with him is aware, Mike’s the nicest guy on the team, although as the newbie, he has to be. For this 40th anniversary volume all the above hands were on deck, but additional thanks are owed to Andrews McMeel honcho Hugh Andrews and honcha Kirsty Melville, whose boundless enthusiasm pushed the book forward; Dorothy O’Brien, for calmly keeping the book on track through its long gestation; Caty Neis, for relentlessly tracking down almost-lost strips; copy chief Dave Shaw, who copyedited everything on the fly; Amy Worley and Kathy Hilliard, for beating the marketing drums softly but persistently; and Michael Reagan, who in addition to the two years he spent overseeing the design and production of the book, surely gave up a couple more anxiously waiting by the presses in China for the final signatures to arrive.

The era of the sensitive singer/songwriter over, Jimmy’s career went into a controlled dive. Over the years, he’s tried everything to pull out of it, from standards to soft rock covers to downloads to ringtones, but nothing has quite seemed to work. Even as a legacy act, Jimmy’s pretty much over. Not that he’s noticed. Jimmy moves ahead doggedly, and to his credit, he’s never once recalled that night at A&M studios as the high-water mark it so clearly was. 9/11/97 9/15/97 9/16/97 9/19/97 11/23/97 11/3/97 11/6/97 11/7/97 11/8/97 11/10/97 11/11/97 11/12/97 11/13/97 10/5/97 12/8/97 12/10/97 12/11/97 12/12/97 1/26/98 1/28/98 1/30/98 1/31/98 2/25/98 2/26/98 2/27/98 2/28/98 3/3/98 3/4/98 3/5/98 3/7/98 1/18/98 4/27/98 4/30/98 5/1/98 5/2/98 6/9/98 6/10/98 6/11/98 6/15/98 6/17/98 6/22/98 6/24/98 6/25/98 6/14/98 7/21/98 7/22/98 7/23/98 7/24/98 8/10/98 8/12/98 8/14/98 8/15/98 12/20/98 9/7/98 9/8/98 9/9/98 9/10/98 9/11/98 9/12/98 9/14/98 9/16/98 12/27/98 11/2/98 11/3/98 11/6/98 11/7/98 11/11/98 11/12/98 11/13/98 11/14/98 4/5/99 4/6/99 4/7/99 4/10/99 4/12/99 4/13/99 4/14/99 4/15/99 1/3/99 6/15/99 6/19/99 6/23/99 6/24/99 7/20/99 7/21/99 7/22/99 7/24/99 7/26/99 7/28/99 7/29/99 7/30/99 3/14/99 8/23/99 8/24/99 8/25/99 8/28/99 8/30/99 8/31/99 9/1/99 9/2/99 11/28/99 On June 16, 1978, I received a telegram from House Speaker Tip O’Neill requesting the withdrawal of some upcoming strips that featured Lacey Davenport discussing the so-called Koreagate scandal.

It’s just as well. Duke, alone among the main characters, arrived in the strip as straight-ahead parody. Duke wasn’t inspired by Thompson, he was Thompson—right down to the name, taken from “Raoul Duke,” Thompson’s pseudonym. Many public figures are parodied, but Thompson, who viewed writing as serious business, apparently found it unnerving to have such an unserious version of himself on the loose. He’d worked hard to become the star of his own work, and consequently viewed the HST brand as proprietary.

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